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The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) has fined Santander £32,817,800 for failing to effectively process the accounts and investments of deceased customers.

19 December 2018

Santander did not transfer funds totalling over £183m to beneficiaries when it should have done. 40,428 customers were directly affected. Santander also failed to disclose information relating to the issues with the probate and bereavement process to the FCA after it became aware of them. Santander breached Principle 3 and Principle 6 between 1 January 2013 and 11 July 2016 by failing to take reasonable care to organise and control its probate and bereavement process responsibly and effectively, with adequate risk management systems, and by failing to treat its customers and those who represented them on their death fairly.

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EBA sees further improvements in EU banks resilience but highlights challenges connected to profitability, funding and operational risk

18 December 2018

The European Banking Authority (EBA) published its annual report on risks and vulnerabilities in the EU banking sector. The report is accompanied by the results of the EBA’s 2018 EU-wide transparency exercise, which provide detailed information, in a comparable and accessible format, for 130 banks across the EU. Overall, the EU banking sector has continued to benefit from the positive macroeconomic developments in most European countries, which contributed to the increase in lending, further strengthening of banks’ capital ratios and improvements in asset quality. Profitability remains low on average and has not yet reached sustainable levels. Continue reading…

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Mark Dunn
Mark Dunn

Unlocking Beneficial Ownership a Key Concern in New ABC Benchmarking Report

10 June 2018

Rising concern about opaque and suspect third-party corporate ownership structures is a notable finding in the Kroll / Ethisphere 2018 Anti-Bribery and Corruption Benchmarking Report. When senior executives working in ethics, compliance or anti-corruption were asked to rank the reasons that potential third parties failed to meet their companies’ standards, risks associated with beneficial structures rose from fifth to third when compared to the previous year’s survey. While still ranking behind general reputational or integrity concerns, and conflicts of interest, such risks were elevated above questionable relationships with politically exposed persons, and unusual contract and payment structures. About 60 percent of respondents reported that they were concerned or very concerned about beneficial ownership risks associated with their third parties, and only one in five were ‘very comfortable’ with the mechanisms they had in place to address these risks. A similar proportion was minimally or not at all comfortable. Continue reading…

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Mark Dunn
Mark Dunn

Global spread

01 February 2018

In October 2016 the International Standards Organisation issued the ISO 37001, a new standard that organisations and companies can use to certify their anti-bribery and corruption compliance procedures. The ISO 37001 was agreed by standards bodies in 37 countries and it is already being promoted by many countries across the world. Peru became the first Latin American country to implement the standard. One reason given for this is that in 2015 the country lost nearly $4 billion because of misappropriation of public funds, bribery and other types of corruption. The government of Montreal in Canada has appointed someone to analyse and propose how to apply the principles of the ISO 37001 to the city. Earlier, Singapore’s Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (CPIB) launched the Singapore Standard, which is based on the ISO 37001. The standard has also been widely adopted in the Middle East and North Africa. Colin Keeney of Deloitte notes that six of the 37 countries involved in crafting the standard came from this region.

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